An Appeal to Pharaoh. The Negro Problem and its Radical Solution. Edited, with introduction, by Gustavus M. Pinckney.

Urgings of Black Expatriation from a former Confederate soldier and journalist


A vocal proponent of black expatriation, Georgia-born Carlyle Mckinley (1847-1904) was a Confederate soldier, journalist, essayist, poet, and associate editor of the Charleston New & Courier

Republished posthumously, An Appeal to Pharaoh is Mckinley’s white supremacist argument, and answer, to the vexing “Negro Problem.” Mckinley’s solution —a voluntary mass exodus of the entire black American population to Africa. The reasonings behind this extraordinary proposal form the nucleus of the text. For this edition, a reprinting of a letter ([xvii]–xix) from In Darkest Africa author and explorer Henry M. Stanley, enthusiastically endorsing Mckinley’s plan. Stanley opines that the upper Congo basin had enough room for all of black America. Further, no indigenous tribes would be disturbed by such a seismic shift caused by such an inflow of population.


Description: An Appeal to Pharaoh. The Negro Problem and its Radical Solution. Edited, with introduction, by Gustavus M. Pinckney.

Columbia, South Carolina: State Company, 1907. 185pp. Third Edition. 12mo, original dark purple cloth, lettered in gilt. Bright and near fine.

[3727529]

Ref. DAB. Work, p602. Blockson Collection 2213.


Price: $50.00

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