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The Regulations Lately Made concerning the Colonies, and the Taxes Imposed upon Them, considered.
The Regulations Lately Made concerning the Colonies, and the Taxes Imposed upon Them, considered.
The Regulations Lately Made concerning the Colonies, and the Taxes Imposed upon Them, considered.
The Regulations Lately Made concerning the Colonies, and the Taxes Imposed upon Them, considered.
The Regulations Lately Made concerning the Colonies, and the Taxes Imposed upon Them, considered.

The Regulations Lately Made concerning the Colonies, and the Taxes Imposed upon Them, considered.

Forced by the Sons of Liberty to swear by oath to never enforce the Stamp Act


First edition. Boston stamp tax collector Andrew Oliver’s copy; signed on title-page.

Ghostwritten by Thomas Whately, this pro-government pamphlet promoted Lord Grenville’s positions on colonial policies and reinforced the idea that the colonists enjoyed “virtual representation” —while under the thumb of English Parliament. (Lapidus) “By the summer of 1765 the substance of the administration’s justification of its action reached America in the form of pro-government pamphlets. Many of them were reprinted in the newspapers and added fuel to the fire of the colonies’ resistance.” (LCP)

Andrew Oliver (1706–1774) was the brother-in-law of Thomas Hutchinson, Massachusetts’ colonial governor. Oliver became a lightning rod for the fury of of the colonists as it was his duty to administer the unpopular Stamp Act. Although privately against the act, Oliver became the most visible target for angry colonists to express their hatred of the Stamp Act, and its larger evil, taxation without representation. The “True-born Sons of Liberty” burned him in effigy in Boston and happily announced his public resignation “under Liberty Tree” on December 17, 1765. After his effigy was burned, Oliver’s house was attacked. He was later forced publicly swear that he would never act as stamp distributor.

From the collection of Matt B. Jones, and undoubtedly purchased from Goodspeed’s, either 350:349, $15, “binder’s cloth” (1941) or (ibid?) 409-390, (1946). Erased dealer notes but one can see “45-” or “15-” and “c410” or “1211” neatly-pencil beneath Jones’ bookplate. Michael Walsh describes Jones, thus: “He chose things with the finest judgment. They always had to be in good condition; they had to be significant. A Matt Jones book in an American institution today is a book to be proud of….”


Description: The Regulations Lately Made concerning the Colonies, and the Taxes Imposed upon Them, considered.

London: Printed for J. Wilkie, in St. Paul’s Church-Yard… 1765. half-title, [1–3], 114pp. Green cloth, gilt-lettered spine. Half-title previously washed and possibly supplied; various foxing and dampstaining.

[3731868]

Sabin 28770. Howes W-311. Adams, American Controversy 65-27a. Lapidus, Liberty & American Revolution. LCP, Rising People.  9han9


Price: $12,500.00

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