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[Antislavery Newspaper with an “Address to Females” from the Female Anti-Slavery Society of Muskingham County, Ohio within:] Herald of Freedom. Concord, N.H. Saturday, July 30, 1836.
[Antislavery Newspaper with an “Address to Females” from the Female Anti-Slavery Society of Muskingham County, Ohio within:] Herald of Freedom. Concord, N.H. Saturday, July 30, 1836.
[Antislavery Newspaper with an “Address to Females” from the Female Anti-Slavery Society of Muskingham County, Ohio within:] Herald of Freedom. Concord, N.H. Saturday, July 30, 1836.
[Antislavery Newspaper with an “Address to Females” from the Female Anti-Slavery Society of Muskingham County, Ohio within:] Herald of Freedom. Concord, N.H. Saturday, July 30, 1836.
[Antislavery Newspaper with an “Address to Females” from the Female Anti-Slavery Society of Muskingham County, Ohio within:] Herald of Freedom. Concord, N.H. Saturday, July 30, 1836.

[Antislavery Newspaper with an “Address to Females” from the Female Anti-Slavery Society of Muskingham County, Ohio within:] Herald of Freedom. Concord, N.H. Saturday, July 30, 1836.

“Nor are we to be bantered from the field because we are women…”


The front page reprints “an eloquent production” — a lengthy “Address to Females” from the Female Anti-Slavery Society of Muskingham County, Ohio:

Nor are we to be bantered from the field because we are women. Women are in captivity and degradation, subject to the most cruel and humiliating bondage; in this, too, without the power to plead their own cause, or appeal to the virtuous and humane, for protection from insult and outrage. This is enough to call forth our sympathies, and nerve our souls, if need be, for persecution and conflict. Taunt and obloquy have already been heaped upon us, and the sphere of female action has been so narrowed down, as to cause us some times to inquire, if the shadows of the dark ages are returning to dim our hemisphere, and shut out the faint glimmerings of millennial glory? In that day of the Lord, the coming of which is so often the burden of the Christian’s prayer, it hath been predicted, that, not our sons only, but our daughters shall prophesy, and upon the servants and handmaidens, in those days, God will pour out his Spirit. If women are to be sharers in the gifts and blessings of that glorious era, surely it must be our duty, as well as privilege, to be auxiliaries in accelerating it. And what more glorious harbinger, we ask, do the signs of the times require, then the breaking of the oppressor’s rod, to indicate, that the reign of the Prince of Peace is soon to be established? Let us labor, then, with untiring vigor, in behalf of the poor captives in our land, fully convinced, that women are not excused from obedience to the Apostolic injunction, “Remember them that are in bonds as bound with them.” (emphases in original)

Especially published for this issue is a three-column letter on the legal case investigating the lynching of Francis McIntosh, a free man of color burned alive in St. Louis. The letter, addressed to St. Louis County judge Luke E. Lawless, was written by abolitionist Rev. David Root of Dover, New Hampshire, a member of the Anti-Slavery Society in Strafford County. Judge Lawless attacked as false the proposition made in a sermon by Root that “slavery is a sin and ought to be abandoned.” Rev. Root replies at length criticizing the judge who had urged the grand jury to make indictment for the crime against McIntosh: “No sir, it is you who have injured the slave You have robbed him of his inalienable rights…You have degraded him, brutalized him, stultified him, made him a beast of burden.”

Root’s sermon had been published in abolitionist Elijah Lovejoy’s newspaper, the St. Louis Observer. When Lovejoy’s editorials condemned the crime against McIntosh and the lynching’s unconstitutionality, mob action forced him to move from St. Louis to nearby Alton, Illinois. Lovejoy’s continued ardent abolitionism and his anti-slavery editorials published there led to an attack on his press and his own murder by a mob.

Also inside this issue, a woodcut illustration “split-screens” two images. The first shows Black children being whipped. The second image shows the same children holding books and being instructed by a teacher, shelves of books behind them. The caption asks:  “Which of these systems of education shall we hand down to posterity?” Original content, articles reprinted from other anti-slavery journals, such as Gerrit Smith’s letter on slavery to Rev. Lyman Beecher, D.D., an anti-slavery poem, “Prayer for the Oppressed,” and a list of abolitionist books for sale at the Anti-Slavery Office in Concord, Hew Hampshire fill out the issue. A scarce newspaper.


Description: [Antislavery Newspaper with an “Address to Females” from the Female Anti-Slavery Society of Muskingham County, Ohio within:] Herald of Freedom. Concord, N.H. Saturday, July 30, 1836.

Concord, N.H. Saturday, July 30, 1836. Vol. 2 No. 22. Whole No. 48. pp[85]–88 (i.e. [4]pp). 20 x 13½ inches. Printed in five columns. Two woodcuts. Folds and a few creases; faint scattered foxing; very good.

[3731722]

N.B. Herald of Freedom was edited weekly by Concord abolitionist Joseph Horace Kimball (1813 – 1838), co-author of Emancipation in the West Indies: a Six Months’ Tour in Antigua, Barbadoes, and Jamaica in 1837 (New York, 1838), an authoritative antebellum text on West Indian emancipation. Thoreau was an admirer of Nathaniel Peabody Rogers, the Herald’s editor, and he wrote of the paper in The Dial.. See Johnson, L. C. (1983). “Native to New England”: Thoreau, “Herald of Freedom,” and “A Week.” Studies in Bibliography, 36, 213–220. wq10


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