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Eighty Years and More (1815-1897): Reminiscences of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.
Eighty Years and More (1815-1897): Reminiscences of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.
Eighty Years and More (1815-1897): Reminiscences of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.
Eighty Years and More (1815-1897): Reminiscences of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.
Eighty Years and More (1815-1897): Reminiscences of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Eighty Years and More (1815-1897): Reminiscences of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Abolitionist, single-tax proponent, suffragette and author, Kentuckian


Inscribed by a Louiville suffragette and co-founder of the Kentucky Woman Suffrage Association.

The first edition of Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s autobiography, an “account of her life as one of the leading thinkers and activists of American feminism [and] an important source for the history of the woman’s rights movement in the nineteenth century.” (Ellen Carol DuBois, 1993 ed.)

This copy was inscribed in 1900 by Susan Look Avery (1817–1915) to her granddaughter, Mary Letchworth Coonley Hollis (1869–1912). Hollis’s name appears as a single-letter correspondent in the papers of Jane Addams.

A Massachusetts native, Susan Look Avery grew up in the “Burned over District” of New York State. She was educated at Utica Female Seminary and taught there for several years. In 1844, she married Benjamin F. Avery, founder of the Avery Plow Works. Settled in Louisiana, the Averys were ardent abolitionists. During the Civil War the Avery factory served as a hospital for wounded Union soldiers.

After her husband’s death, Susan Look Avery became involved in other reform movements: temperance, pacifism, the single tax, women’s clubs, and suffragism. In October of 1881, the American Woman Suffrage Association met in Louisville. Its leader, Lucy Stone, stayed at Avery’s home. At this convention, Avery helped found the Kentucky Woman Suffrage Association.

The year after the establishment of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association in 1888, Avery organized its Louisville branch, the Louisville Equal Rights Association. The following year, Avery founded the Louisville Women’s Club and she was in the sphere of Carrie Chapman Catt, Alice Stone Blackwell, Harriet Taylor Upton, and Susan B. Anthony.


Description: Eighty Years and More (1815-1897): Reminiscences of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

New York: European Publishing Company, (1897) 1898. Frontispiece 474, (2, adverts), [2]pp. Publisher’s cloth. Later bookplate and later inscription. The fore –margins and –edges between pp70-120 have, variously, light creases, small paper flaws, or gentle bumping; else very good.

[3731621]

Refs.  Kirk, “Susan Look Avery, A Nineteenth Century Reformer” in Historical Wyoming [County], Vol XXIV, No. 3, January 1978 (Warsaw, N.Y.), pp[57]–64.  Guethlein, “Women in Louisville: Moving Toward Equal Rights” in The Filson Club History Quarterly, Vol. 55, No. 2, April 1981 (Louisville), pp151–178.  Votes for Kentucky Women: How Kentucky Joined the Nation in The Fight for Women’s Suffrage accessed online. 9han9


Price: $1,250.00