[Latin America:] Speech of Mr. Benton, of Missouri, Delivered in the Senate of the United States (in Secret Session,) on the Mission to Panama, March 13, 1826.


“Contains the secret debate in the U.S. Congress on whether the U.S. should attend the first inter-American conference called by Bolivar to establish a confederation that would provide mutual security in defense of American independence and act as a conciliator in differences between American states. This meeting initiated the beginning phase of Pan-Americanism, and a great deal on U.S. – Latin American relations may be inferred from the equivocal attitudes exhibited in this interesting pamphlet.” (Jenkins)

Benton opposed the U.S. sending delegates to this convention unless certain conditions were met or sufficient information being supplied. Benton lays out a systematic argument for his position including an analysis or comparison of two Confederacies, “English American States” and “Spanish American States,” and their “fatal” differences and “the diplomatic pretensions of the Congress at Panama.”

The United States was reluctant to enter into such a partnership and failed to send their two delegates.

OCLC records 9 physical locations. The Jenkins copy is the only one we have traced in the trade.


Description: [Latin America:] Speech of Mr. Benton, of Missouri, Delivered in the Senate of the United States (in Secret Session,) on the Mission to Panama, March 13, 1826.

Washington [D.C.]: Printed at the Columbian Star Office, 1826. 47, [1 (blank)]pp. 8vo. Pamphlet; removed; brief foxing; former pencil impression mark to title-page; small corner loss in blank margin of final leaf; Good.

[3730330]

DeRenne p152. Sabin 4787.


Price: $450.00

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