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Correspondence, between the Hon. F.H. Elmore, one of the South Carolina delegation in Congress, and James G. Birney, one of the secretaries of the American Anti-Slavery Society.
Correspondence, between the Hon. F.H. Elmore, one of the South Carolina delegation in Congress, and James G. Birney, one of the secretaries of the American Anti-Slavery Society.

Correspondence, between the Hon. F.H. Elmore, one of the South Carolina delegation in Congress, and James G. Birney, one of the secretaries of the American Anti-Slavery Society.


Number 8 from the Anti-Slavery Examiner. Kentucky reformer, Princeton graduate, and anti-slavery proponent, James Gillespie Birney (1792–1857), here responds to questions from South Carolina’s F.H. Elmore regarding the goals of the American Anti-Slavery Society and of abolitionists, writ large. Birney inherited enslaved African Americans, but came to be a proponent of colonization. When he became disenchanted with this position, he moved North and became a full-throated abolitionist.

“As a former slaveholder Birney spoke with the voice of authority on race and slavery; as a lawyer he spoke as a moderate on constitutional issues. For him politics was a means to an end, never an end in itself. He died realizing that moderation on the race issue would not prevail but that civil war would tear the nation apart before emancipation could be proclaimed.” (ANB)


Description: Correspondence, between the Hon. F.H. Elmore, one of the South Carolina delegation in Congress, and James G. Birney, one of the secretaries of the American Anti-Slavery Society.

New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. 68pp. Stitched, as issued. Title-leaf and scattered leaves throughout with pale stains or light foxing or mild crease lines; Good.

[3730122]

Sabin 5573. Work p298. Imprints 49295.


Price: $150.00