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Correspondence, between the Hon. F.H. Elmore, one of the South Carolina delegation in Congress, and James G. Birney, one of the secretaries of the American Anti-Slavery Society.
Correspondence, between the Hon. F.H. Elmore, one of the South Carolina delegation in Congress, and James G. Birney, one of the secretaries of the American Anti-Slavery Society.

Correspondence, between the Hon. F.H. Elmore, one of the South Carolina delegation in Congress, and James G. Birney, one of the secretaries of the American Anti-Slavery Society.


Number 8 from the Anti-Slavery Examiner. Kentucky reformer, Princeton graduate, and anti-slavery proponent, James Gillespie Birney (1792–1857), here responds to questions from South Carolina’s F.H. Elmore regarding the goals of the American Anti-Slavery Society and of abolitionists, writ large.

Birney inherited enslaved African Americans, but came to be a proponent of colonization. When he became disenchanted with this position, he moved North and became a full-throated abolitionist.

“As a former slaveholder Birney spoke with the voice of authority on race and slavery; as a lawyer he spoke as a moderate on constitutional issues [...] He died realizing that moderation on the race issue would not prevail but that civil war would tear the nation apart before emancipation could be proclaimed.” (ANB)


Description: Correspondence, between the Hon. F.H. Elmore, one of the South Carolina delegation in Congress, and James G. Birney, one of the secretaries of the American Anti-Slavery Society.

New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. 68pp. Stitched, as issued. Title-leaf and scattered leaves throughout with pale stains or light foxing or crease lines; Good.

[3730122]

Sabin 5573. Work p298. Imprints 49295.


Price: $150.00