Memoirs of a Monticello Slave, as Dictated to Charles Campbell in the 1840’s by Isaac, one of Thomas Jefferson’s Slaves.


Autobiographical memoir of Thomas Jefferson’s enslaved blacksmith Isaac Jefferson (1775–1850) as recorded by author and teacher Charles Campbell. 

Edited and with an historical and bibliographical introduction by African-American historian and Howard University professor, Rayford Logan. 

“[S]lave of Thomas Jefferson and narrator of valuable memoirs, Isaac Jefferson was born at Monticello in December 1775 and taken to Yorktown by the British. He apparently lived at Monticello after his release at the end of the Revolutionary War. He accompanied Jefferson to Philadelphia in 1790, and returned to Monticello for about nine years [...] He helped nurse Jefferson in his old age (Jefferson died in 1826). Little is known about his subsequent life except that in 1847 he was a blacksmith in Petersburg, Va., with a shop not far from Pocahontas Bridge. His reminiscences, published as Memoirs of a Monticello Slave… [...] is one of the least known of the slave narratives, it is one of the most authentic and valuable for the information about Thomas Jefferson.” (DANB)


Description: Memoirs of a Monticello Slave, as Dictated to Charles Campbell in the 1840’s by Isaac, one of Thomas Jefferson’s Slaves.

Charlottesville, Virginia: University of Virginia Press for The Tracy W. McGregor Library, 1951. Frontispiece, [5], [2], 3–45, [1 (colophon)]pp. First separate edition, limited to 1,000 copies; published simultaneously in the William & Mary Quarterly. Publisher’s cloth with gilt spine titling; with dust jacket. A very good clean copy; interior tape mends, discreet, to printed dust jacket.

[3728764]

Brignano (rev.) 542: “He tells more about President Jefferson than about himself, but does allude to episodes in his life in Philadelphia and Richmond, Virginia.”


Price: $50.00