The Negro Question. Attitude of the Progressive Party Toward the Colored Race. Colonel Roosevelt’s Reply to a Query at the Progressive National Convention; His Letter to Julian Harris, of Atlanta.

“Bull Moose” Party Convention controversy over seating Southern Black delegates


At the 1912 Progressive or “Bull Moose” Party Convention a controversy arose over Southern black delegates. While the convention allowed black delegates from Northern States to participate, some in the party and its presidential nominee, Theodore Roosevelt, objected to African-American delegates from the South whom they viewed as unable to effect progressive political change. Roosevelt writes: “I earnestly believe that by appealing to the best white man in the South, the men of justice and vision…and by frankly putting the movement in their hands…we shall create a situation by which the colored men of the South will ultimately get justice…” In fact, the Progressive Party’s platform—its “Contract With the People”—did not even address civil rights for Blacks. The Negro Question documents Roosevelt’s interaction with white progressive Southern journalist Julian Harris and includes Roosevelt’s editorial “The Progressive and the Colored Man.” With a large “Bull Moose” Party moose stamp on upper cover. Well-represented on OCLC. Scarce to commerce and in such fine condition.


Description: The Negro Question. Attitude of the Progressive Party Toward the Colored Race. Colonel Roosevelt’s Reply to a Query at the Progressive National Convention; His Letter to Julian Harris, of Atlanta.

[New York: Mail and Express Job Print. 1912.] 16pp. First Edition. Self-titled wraps. A fine copy.

[3727441]

Work, p395.


Price: $650.00