The Negro Worker in Minnesota. A Report to Governor Edward J. Thye of Minnesota by The Governor’s Interracial Commission.

Immediate post-World War II report on black labor; much on labor unions


Report from a special interracial commission exploring why industrial Minnesota denies employment to black workers and how this might impact the post-World War II state economy:

The vital point in this report is the finding of the Commission that while during wartime all Negroes in Minnesota can obtain both full employment and a fair opportunity for upgrading, yet in peacetimes a much larger proportion of Negroes than white persons cannot secure any employment; and of Negroes employed few enjoy opportunities for being upgraded. In addition to this information, the Commission has tried to explore the mind of industrial Minnesota to determine why the Negro is denied employment. (p[iv])

The report identifies sectors of the labor market where black Minnesotans have had limited job opportunities—e.g. public utilities, breweries, trucking, printing—and poses such questions as “Who Are the Persons in Minnesota Who Keep Negroes from Working?”.

Includes two questionnaires, one for employers and one for labor unions asking such questions as “Would you give employment to returning Negro soldiers?” (for Employers) and “If white employees objected to working with a Negro, would the union officials immediately go to the place of employment to dissuade the white workers from the procedure?” (for Unions).


Description: The Negro Worker in Minnesota. A Report to Governor Edward J. Thye of Minnesota by The Governor’s Interracial Commission.

[Np: np], 1945. [iv], 57pp. First Edition. Booklet . 8 x 5½ inches. Illustrated, cream-colored wrappers; stapled. Very good.

[3727061]

Price: $45.00