[1827 Autograph Letter Signed to Publisher and Economist Mathew Carey from Pennsylvania Congressman and later U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Samuel D. Ingham].

In 1827 America: “Nations ought never to make sudden changes”


In 1827, Samuel D. Ingham (1779–1860) of Pennsylvania was serving in Congress as a U.S. Representative.

In less than two years he would become the ninth U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. It is not surprising, therefore, to find Ingham writing at this time to influential publisher and economist Mathew Carey of Philadelphia.

Representative Ingham, who was regularly attacked in the press, here clears up a possible misunderstanding with Carey. Ingham also seeks to put the brakes on Carey’s fervor for quick actions to solve economic problems:

I was too well acquainted with you to suspect for a moment that you were the author of the political attack upon me in the Dem. Press, in truth I have been so much abused in that paper and in every instance without the slightest regard to truth, that its attacks have lost all impression upon me, and it is only by accident that, I see any of them, as I have not even the curiosity to borrow the paper for that purpose — (your zeal for the promotion of domestic industry I appreciate with the greatest respect for your honest zeal & talents) if you will do me the favor to read my last speech on that subject, you will see that I am not among the last in that [indistinct word], but I have never agreed with you as to the extent of the means to be employed for that purpose, but it is constitutional with you to act with rapidity and not to be satisfied with a gradual approach to your ultima Thule. In my Judgment nations ought never to make sudden changes or rapid marches after new pursuits – and most especially nations having such varied interests and character & objects of industry as ours.

Respectful of Carey, Congressman Ingham still manages to point out Carey’s “constitutional” impatience. As a politician (playing it safe), Ingham urges caution.

Ingham concludes by standing up for himself. He continues:

I know you are truly and honestly convinced of the soundness of your opinions & I have no idea that I can change one of them, but I will take some other occasion when I have more leisure to satisfy you that my opinions are not hastily formed nor without reason.

A respectful letter to an influential economic opinion maker. Congressman Samuel D. Ingham stands his ground with a cautious approach to promoting American manufacturing and commerce.


Description: [1827 Autograph Letter Signed to Publisher and Economist Mathew Carey from Pennsylvania Congressman and later U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Samuel D. Ingham].

New Hope [Pennsylvania], March 15, [18]27. [2]pp. Autograph Letter Signed. 10 x 8 inches. Folio; wove paper. Folds; old inexpert mends barely affecting text; overall, very good.

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In 1827 America: “Nations ought never to make sudden changes”

Congressman Samuel D. Ingham urges caution on domestic industry to American business booster Mathew Carey


Price: $150.00